Fashion’s September edit: shibori zari and a ballet-inspired bag

September 9, 2021 0 Comments


A reinvented textile print and a triangular leather bag, we pick the season’s must-haves

Shibori weaves at Bindu Giri

Indian fashion’s Japanese connection has been around for a while, with designers such as Rahul Mishra, Anita Dongre, and Aneeth Arora, among others, having adapted techniques of origami, Wabi-Sabi, and the like, in their work. The manual tie-dyeing technique of shibori continues to be a favourite. Kochi-based Anitha KA recently reinvented the traditional kasavu with a tie and dye effect at her label, MoonGodess, while last month, Bunaai, the ready-to-wear brand from Jaipur, launched a collection featuring kaftans, jumpsuits and dresses in the signature Japanese print.

The latest designer to join the shibori bandwagon is Chennai’s Bindu Giri. Known for her textiles featuring traditional prints such as ikat, jamdani and kalamkari, her new range, Shibori, features saris with intricate zari and thread work.

“I’ve created a series of versatile and statement kanjeevaram saris [in shades like aubergine, coconut milk, and mustard] with my take on the shibori as a zari weave on the pallu,” she says. “I’ve taken the base of shibori dyeing technique and explored various classic motifs such as the shell, and fused them with our traditional yazhi.

With shibori used only on the pallus, the weaves can be styled in different ways — with blazers, as a skirt, and more. “This was a conscious decision,” says Giri, adding, “You’re not boxed into wearing it as a traditional sari, and you have the opportunity to explore drapes as skirts, dhoti pants, etc.” ₹13,200 onwards at bindugirithelabel.com.

Fashion’s September edit: shibori zari and a ballet-inspired bag

The triangular bag at Adisee

Adding to India’s indie leather brands — which comprises names such as Mumbai-based Grain, and Chiaroscuro and Nappa Dori in the capital — is Aditi Khorana’s Adisee. The New Delhi-based brand has dropped ‘Jade’, a triangular leather bag with repurposed beechwood handle. “Each piece creates a geometric balance. I drew from my experience as a trained ballet, jazz and contemporary dancer and put the counterbalance technique to use [in the design], wherein one or more dancers would combine their weight to achieve a movement,” says Khorana.

The bags come with detachable straps and can transition between a clutch, crossbody, and a sling. Available in three variants: Ivory, Sand and Black. ₹10,990 on adisee.co.in.



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